Utrecht, Netherlands

From Print to Paint: Histories and Methods of Artistic Production

blended course
when 5 July 2021 - 16 July 2021
language English
duration 2 weeks
credits 3 EC
fee EUR 680

This course is mainly offered in an online setting, with on-site lab sessions possible for the second week of the course.

How do artists make their art? Does painting in oil result in different working procedures and visual effects compared to other media? Which material and technical properties determine the creative possibilities of prints, sculptures, and the applied arts? What can art historians learn from re-making art, re-working historical recipes, or reproducing material objects? This course will immerse you in discussions related to art production and (re-)making, materials and materiality, and techniques and technology.

This course integrates research methods typical for the humanities and historical disciplines with practical work in the studio or lab. You will be introduced to issues in artistic production through online lectures and readings. You can go through this part of the course at your own pace during the first week. The second week of the course consists of hands-on experimentation with several materials and techniques. Students can choose to follow the second week online or on-site if the situation permits.

Students will work on the same experiments for both online and on-site versions. Online students are expected to complete the experiments prior to or on the same day as the on-site students. Towards the end of each day during week two, there will be a virtual discussion session with all online and on-site students to reflect upon the practical work of that day.

Online students will be able to explore the practical components by taking the creative solution of setting up a home lab—namely a table, a simple stove or hot plate, a sink and running water. You will receive a kit with essential materials and tools prior to the beginning of the course, and you can keep the starter kit for your future explorations. Natural materials and non-toxic substitutes of certain substances will be used so that you can safely conduct the experiments at home.

On-site students will work with the instructor(s) in Utrecht University's Kunstlab. You will benefit from the space and equipment (such as a printmaking press) of the Kunstlab and have access to a greater range of materials for experimentation. You will also be able to team up with your peers to solve problems and modify the steps together as you work on the experiments. Such collaboration is an important aspect of conducting hands-on research.

The course consists of a week’s workload, but is stretched out to two weeks to accommodate those who will be partaking the course remotely while working. You will have four weeks (5 to 30 July 2021) to access the course materials through an online platform and write the paper if you want to earn credits. Upon completion, you will have deepened your knowledge in the histories and theories of artistic production.

Course leader

Jessie Wei-Hsuan Chen

Target group

Students who wish to take this course should have some academic training, as there will be substantial readings and intensive discussions. This course is also suitable for MA and PhD students who wish to apply historical remaking as a methodology and learn practical skills, as no previous experience in artistic production and making is required.

Course aim

This course introduces participants to several historical materials and techniques in the visual and decorative arts before the nineteenth century through engaging with the methodology of remaking and closely studying museum objects in person.

Fee info

EUR 680: This course is mainly offered in an online setting, with on-site lab sessions possible for the second week of the course.

How do artists make their art? Does painting in oil result in different working procedures and visual effects compared to other media? Which material and technical properties determine the creative possibilities of prints, sculptures, and the applied arts? What can art historians learn from re-making art, re-working historical recipes, or reproducing material objects? This course will immerse you in discussions related to art production and (re-)making, materials and materiality, and techniques and technology.

This course integrates research methods typical for the humanities and historical disciplines with practical work in the studio or lab. You will be introduced to issues in artistic production through online lectures and readings. You can go through this part of the course at your own pace during the first week. The second week of the course consists of hands-on experimentation with several materials and techniques. Students can choose to follow the second week online or on-site if the situation permits.

Students will work on the same experiments for both online and on-site versions. Online students are expected to complete the experiments prior to or on the same day as the on-site students. Towards the end of each day during week two, there will be a virtual discussion session with all online and on-site students to reflect upon the practical work of that day.

Online students will be able to explore the practical components by taking the creative solution of setting up a home lab—namely a table, a simple stove or hot plate, a sink and running water. You will receive a kit with essential materials and tools prior to the beginning of the course, and you can keep the starter kit for your future explorations. Natural materials and non-toxic substitutes of certain substances will be used so that you can safely conduct the experiments at home.

On-site students will work with the instructor(s) in Utrecht University's Kunstlab. You will benefit from the space and equipment (such as a printmaking press) of the Kunstlab and have access to a greater range of materials for experimentation. You will also be able to team up with your peers to solve problems and modify the steps together as you work on the experiments. Such collaboration is an important aspect of conducting hands-on research.

The course consists of a week’s workload, but is stretched out to two weeks to accommodate those who will be partaking the course remotely while working. You will have four weeks (5 to 30 July 2021) to access the course materials through an online platform and write the paper if you want to earn credits. Upon completion, you will have deepened your knowledge in the histories and theories of artistic production.
EUR 350: Housing (optional)

Register for this course
on course website