United Kingdom, Cambridge

Interdisciplinary Summer Programme

when 7 July 2019 - 17 August 2019
language English
duration 6 weeks

The three terms of the Interdisciplinary Programme offer courses covering a wide variety of subjects, including philosophy, economics, international politics & relations, art & architecture, literature, history and science.

The academic programme
• Two or three courses (one from each group)
• Series of plenary lectures: Intelligence
• Evening talks
• Contact hours: up to 56.5 hours per term

Programme description
Each two-week term is independent, for an immersive experience, we suggest you study for four or six weeks, combining two, or all three terms. However, you may enrol for just one term if you prefer. You can focus your studies on two or three courses in the same discipline, or choose courses in differing subjects. With hundreds of possible course combinations, you can devise your own personalised study programme.

"A great opportunity for cross-disciplinary study: the wealth and breadth of these courses reflect Cambridge at its very best." Sarah J Ormrod, Programme Director, Interdisciplinary Summer Programme

Courses

Select two or three courses per term. Teaching takes place on weekdays; the maximum class size for all courses is 25 participants, except for International politics in a global age which is 40. You can write one essay per course for evaluation.

TERM I (7 – 20 July)

Group A: 9.00am – 10.15am
A11 - Managing the world: international politics and the global order
A12 - Britain and its Empire, 1763-1919
A13 - Metropolis and Imperialism, Roman and Aztec
A14 - British culture and traditions
A15 - British politics and political thought, 1600-1800
A16 - Medieval science: the not-so-Dark Ages?

Group B: 11.45am – 1.00pm
B11 - Managing the world: international politics and the global order
B12 - Visions of the future
B13 - Ancient and medieval philosophers
B14 - Russia: from Lenin to Stalin, 1917-53
B15 - Understanding the Earth and its history
B16 - Challenging gender and the status quo in American cinema history

Group C: 2.00pm – 3.15pm
C11 - Managing the world: international politics and the global order
C12 - An introduction to international business
C13 - Literary influences I: identity, place and class
C14 - Greek and Roman epic heroes: Achilles, Odysseus and Aeneas
C15 - Built on a fortune: British status homes

TERM II (21 July – 3 August)

Group A: 9.00am – 10.15am
A21 - War, peace and destruction: the international politics of global power
A22 - The great Prime Ministers
A23 - Literary influences II: crossing cultures
A24 - The philosophy of mind
A25 - British politics and political thought, 1800 to the present
A26 - Medieval science: the not-so-Dark Ages?

Group B: 11.45am – 1.00pm
B21 - War, peace and destruction: the international politics of global power
B22 - Sustainability: creating a more sustainable world
B23 - The nature of knowledge
B24 - An introduction to animal behaviour
B25 - The abridged history of English

Group C: 2.00pm – 3.15pm
C21 - War, peace and destruction: the international politics of global power
C22 - International development: competing discourses and current challenges
C23 - Great modern philosophers
C24 - The medicinal properties of plants
C25 - An introduction to Hellenistic poetry, from Alexander the Great to Cleopatra

TERM III (4 – 17 August)

Group A: 9.00am – 10.15am
A31 - Visions of the future
A32 - The landscape history of Britain
A33 - Literary influences III: wider worlds, fantastic places
A34 - The human mind: the 'normal' and beyond

Group B: 11.45am – 1.00pm
B31 - English houses and gardens: defining Englishness
B32 - 1519: the fate of the Aztecs
B33 - Literary influences IV: heroes and villains
B34 - The human mind: the 'normal' and beyond
B35 - 1919-2019: a hundred years of Western art in 10 objects

Group C: 2.00pm – 3.15pm
C31 - Castles, palaces and houses of British monarchs
C32 - International development: competing discourses and current challenges
C33 - British politics at the dawn of a new era
C34 - Philosophy, humour and the absurd

Plenary lectures
All participants also attend the morning plenary lecture series, this year the theme Intelligence is applied across politics, scientific discovery, literature, art, economics, conflict, climate change and a wide variety of other topics.

Evening talks
Eminent speakers will present a variety of general interest talks. These are shared with students on our other programmes.

Course leader

Sarah J Ormrod

Target group

We welcome applications from all adults including university students, professionals and those with other experience, regardless of educational background.

Course aim

This programme is particularly useful for those with an interest in, or currently studying, a number of subjects, or those wanting to expand the range of subjects they might study in future. Many courses offer introductions to the subject, others are a little more specialised. The International Politics courses, for example, are fully immersive, meeting three times a day. Unless otherwise specified, no courses require prior learning, but there is usually required and/or supplementary reading which should be undertaken before you arrive in Cambridge.

Credits info

The University of Cambridge does not use a credit system for the awarding of its internal degrees, and cannot award credit directly for its International Summer Programmes. Students wishing to obtain credit as a result of our evaluation should consult their own institutions in advance about the acceptability of the Summer Programmes evaluation for credit purposes.

Fee info

GBP 0: See official website